Mortaljive: The Rest is Silence

There is no still point in all the Universe, and that is the rock upon which I stand

Saturday, March 26, 2011

Ophelia, Act II



she loved a man who would not settle down, down, down
she wanted love and a wedding gown, gown, gown
in the water, neptune's daughter, no sound, sound, sound
she is waiting there

what a face, what a heart so sweet, sweet, sweet
eyes like the sky, her hair just like wheat, wheat, wheat
wilting in the sun, wilting in the heat, heat, heat
she is waiting there
just waiting there
she is waiting there
will her lover still love her when she is gone, gone, gone

the water's cold upon her skin, skin, skin
she thought of love and could only grin, grin, grin
she's tracing circles in the water with a spin, spin, spin
she is waiting there

sometimes she thinks she can fly, fly, fly
but she comes down when she starts to cry, cry, cry
she paints a private world and doesn't say why, why, why
she is waiting there
she is waiting there
will her lover still love her when she is gone, gone, gone

lovers are dancers inside the fire of life
lovers feel each other inside the fire of life
lovers are falling inside the fire of life
lovers evolving into the endless night, night, night

she loved a man who would not settle down, down, down
she wanted love and a wedding gown, gown, gown
in the water, neptune's daughter, no sound, sound, sound
she is waiting there

what a face, what a heart so sweet, sweet, sweet
eyes like the sky, her hair just like wheat, wheat, wheat
wilting in the sun, wilting in the heat, heat, heat
she is waiting there
just waiting there
she is waiting there
will her lover still love her when she is gone, gone, gone
oh...

**

2 Comments:

At 11:36 AM, Blogger SeattleDan said...

Do you know Millais' painting of the drowned Ophelia? I know many don't like Pre-Raphaelite art (I do, actually), and the painting is haunting.

http://painting.about.com/od/figuresportraits/ig/Millais-Paintings/Tate-Millais-Ophelia.htm

 
At 6:47 PM, Blogger mjs said...

Thank you for reminding me of that amazing painting. Yes, there is something bewitching revealed by Millais--perhaps it is the attention to detail and density of symbols that make the effect so profound. Ophelia's devastating grief and breakdown are achingly real, even while she exudes an eternal sense of peace in death. Sorrow is a maiden's consort...

 

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